Lidl French Wine Tour: in store NOW

Lidl has a few interesting wines in its current French Wine September promotion. I haven’t tasted them but I acknowledge and respect the review notes that I have read and reprint below. Two that caught my eye are worth exploring. Muscadet because its one of the most under rated excellent dry white wine styles around and Bordeaux because Lidl is one of the biggest buyers of wine in the region. Very often that translates into excellent value! Enjoy.

Domaine des Deux Vallons Muscadet Severe et Maine sur lie 2019 €9.99 £6.99

Tom Cannavan’s Wine Pages tells us: The ‘Sur Lie’ bit means the wine has been aged on its ‘lees’, the spent yeast cells that gather post-fermentation, to add texture and richness. Crunchy apple fruit on the nose, lemon, showing just a hint of the briney character of these seaside wines. On the palate it has surprisingly sweet fruit: wines of this appellation can often be bone-dry, being all about the salty, chalky dry minerality that is heaven-sent for shellfish and seafood, but this has upfront fruit, edging into the tropical spectrum. A hint of sweetness to the finish is swept up in good acidity, so it does finish with clarity

Frankly Wine tells us:

If you are new to Muscadet then the label above contains two very important pieces of information:

  1. The wine is made in the Sèvre et Maine subregion (named after the two rivers which flow through)
  2. The wine has spent time Sur Lie, i.e. in contact with the dead yeast cells which fermented the wine and give it a creamy, bready aspect.

What the label doesn’t impart is the quality of the wine – but thankfully it gets the thumbs up from me.  Compared to many Muscadets this has very good depth of flavour, not that easy to produce on the Loire’s Atlantic Coast.  It’s full of Granny Smiths apples and zesty citrus, perfect for an aperitif or with oysters.

Chateau Margerots Bordeaux Superieur 2019 €8.99

Frankly Wine tells us: Now to Bordeaux, the most famous red wine area in the world.  Although the famous Châteaux get the lion’s share of attention, the vast majority of Bordelais wine is much more modest…such as this Bordeaux Supérieur.  The Supérieur tag isn’t that meaningful these days, but the reds are normally quite drinkable Merlot-based blends.  The assemblage here fits that bill: 50% Merlot, 30% Cabernet Sauvignon, 15% Cabernet Franc and 5% Petit Verdot.  In fact there’s quite a lot of Cab Sauv for such a “Petit Château” – and it’s one of the reasons why this wine is so dark when poured, though still exhibiting a youthful purple tinge.  The nose is centred around a graphite core (typical from Cabernet Sauvignon) surrounded by tight black fruit.  The fruit opens up on the palate which shows juicy blackcurrant and plum, with a touch of leather and soft tannin on the finish.  What a great way to get into Bordeaux!